Ghosts Of Manhattan by Douglas Brunt

Ghosts of Manhattan

It’s 2005, Nick Farmer is a 30-something bond trader who is hooked on the amazing amount of money he’s making for doing very little.

GHOSTS OF MANHATTAN by Douglas Brunt is, at times, quite humorous. But the theme of the story will hit home with many readers. Who wrote all those bad mortgages? How did it happen? Could  big business really have been that greedy and stupid? The answers are all yeses, all across the board.

This was a quick and easy read for me. I squeezed it in between two other books. I did it because the writing was good and the story is both interesting and informational.  We all know someone who has lost their home to this mess. We all are affected by it in some form or another. No, it sure isn’t funny. But Brunt gives us this story in a quirky and blunt way.

The novel begins with Nick Farmer interviewing for a job with Bear Stearns to sell bonds. He’s attended a pedigree college and met some jocks and intellectuals along the way. The interview itself is totally off the wall and unethical. And so the story begins its almost frenetic pace through the lives of the young people who trade bonds on the market.

For those of us who are ignorant of bond trading and this life style in general, it’s almost like being on crack. All the time. How long can one keep this up? That’s one of the questions Nick begins to ask himself. And Nick has a wife. How would a spouse put up with this? It is mind-boggling.

When Nick is faced with information that is bound to be devastating to the entire industry, he most make a decision that could cost him everything.

Douglas Blunt

If you want to know more about what went wrong with the mortgage situation, this is your book. It’s written so you can understand it. You may not like it but, it’s sure to make you think.

Douglas Blunt was a CEO of an internet security company.

My review copy came from Touchstone, a division of Simon & Schuster. Thanks guys.

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